Piotr Szotkowski

Piotr Szotkowski

Piotr is a hacker scientist: an assistant professor at Warsaw University of Technology, a Ruby developer at Rebased and a founding member of Warsaw Hackerspace. When not coding (or talking about coding) he coaches at Rails Girls Warsaw, organises Warsaw Ruby Users Group and NetWtorek – monthly meetings of people from the NGO/non-profit and IT sectors, as well as SocHack – quarterly 48-hour hackatons for worthy causes, in coordination with Random Hacks of Kindness, Open Data Day and Open Education Week.

Persist, Little Objects!

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Object persistence in Ruby is a tricky subject – everyone knows how to do it (‘simply use an ORM, plug it into a relational database and you’re done!’), most know the drawbacks (‘well, sure, you need to use a document database for the more schema-less cases… or serialise the variable parts… and, of course, object references need to be handled separately…’), but few experiment with alternatives.

This talk, after recalling the popular database-driven persistence solutions, concentrates on the less known, but more interesting and often quite useful approaches – from file-based PStore (ideal for small apps), through Candy’s out-of-the-way magic, to MagLev’s true cross-process transparent object persistence.

Previous talks

Standard Library, Uncommon Uses (2013)

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There are tonnes of little- or virtually unknown libraries in Ruby’s stdlib, and they found their way there for a reason. Much like revisiting Enumerable’s method list times and again makes you a better Ruby programmer, so does looking into its standard library – not only because there are things you didn’t know existed, but also because the way the’re implemented is often quite enlightening.

This talk shows some of the useful, clever and tricky uses of Ruby’s standard library – like GServer, DRb/Rinda, PStore, Ripper and SecureRandom – that do not require the installation of any gems and can be used in any environment hosting a Ruby implementation. Did you ever want to write your own server, do some distributed computing, don’t worry about persistence? It’s all there; come and see for yourself!