Phil Nash

Phil Nash

Phil is a developer living and working in London. He's been writing HTML since the tag was cool. He spends his days flipping between JavaScript and Ruby creating delightful social websites at Mint Digital. When not thinking about code, he enjoys music festivals, beer and secretly thinking about code.

JavaScript in the next generation

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JavaScript, once a "toy" language is now driving the interfaces of the most popular sites on the web. We've come a long way from snowflakes drifting over a site around Christmas time, now creating powerful client side applications. But JavaScript can do more for us than taking the heat off the server. There is a new generation of interfaces emerging in our browsers that will allow us to do even more interesting stuff in the client side of our apps. This talk will cover some of the interesting integrations between browser and device that are becoming available to us through JavaScript. From existing APIs, such as Geolocation, to bleeding edge stuff like the Battery API (woo!) or getting input from cameras or microphones with getUserMedia, we'll discover how browsers in the near future will shape users' interactions with our apps.

Previous talks

How to create the perfect prototype (2013)

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Prototyping is hard. As a digital agency, Mint Digital has created a number of prototype applications for clients, however these have been some of our least satisfying projects. Whilst we have been inspired by the project and put in the extra mile to delight, things sometimes just don't quite click.

It's taken us a while, and we've been through quite an experience to get to this point, but at Mint, we think we have solved the issue in a way that works for us, for our clients and for the end product. And all it takes is 4 days!

We'll look at the problems that prototypes can face; slippage, lack of focus and bloat. We'll see how our solution materialised out of Mint's company culture in a way that truly surprised us. We'll recap those initial issues and how we solve them and finally we'll look over how Rails helps us as developers and how we can help ourselves when creating prototype applications. By the end, 4 days is all you will need to create anything!